WHY DO WE DO THIS

LGBT BULLYING

 

  • LBG youth are 4 times more likely, and questioning youth are 3 times more likely, to attempt suicide than their straight peers [2]

  • Suicide attempts by LGB youth and questioning youth are 4 to 6 times more likely to result in injury, poisoning, or overdose that requires treatment from a doctor or nurse, compared to their straight peers. [3]

  • Nearly half of young transgender people have seriously thought about taking their lives, and one quarter report having made a suicide attempt. [4]

  • LGB youth who come from highly rejecting families are 8.4 times as likely to have attempted suicide as LGB peers who reported no or low levels of family rejection. [5]

  • Each episode of LGBT victimization, such as physical or verbal harassment or abuse, increases the likelihood of self-harming behavior by 2.5 times on average. [8]

 

SUICIDE

 

It is difficult to determine causation between bullying and suicidal ideation, but there is correlation bet bullying and depression and anxiety, which cause elevated risk for suicidal ideation. 

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death in young people ages 10 - 24 [1]

  • 4400 Young People Commit Suicide Each Year

  • 1 out of 6 students nationwide (grades 9-12) seriously considered suicide in the past year

  • For every suicide, there are at least 100 suicide attempts

  • Some studies show that 80% of teen suicides may be attributable to bullying [9]

  • Suicide attempts are nearly two times higher among Black and Hispanic youth than White youth. [7]

 

BULLYING IN SCHOOLS

 

The issue of bullying in schools is widespread and devastating to students of all ages. According to StopBullying.gov, with data by Robers, et al, in 2013:

  • 37% of 6th grade students are victims of bullying

  • 28% of Junior High and High school students are victims of bullying

  • 160,000 kids stay home each day because of fear of bullying

Other studies report that 90% of children in grades 4 through 8 have been bullied. Source: DoSomething.org

 

Research shows that students who have been bullied are more likely to develop:

  • School avoidance and lower academic achievement 

  • Psychosomatic problems such as headaches, stomach aches, sleep problems, and poor appetite 

  • Low self-esteem 

  • Depression

  • Anxiety

  • Later problems with alcohol and other drugs 

 

CYBER-BULLYING

 

Kids spend an average of 44.5 hours online each week. 

  • 37 percent of cyberbullying incidents go unreported.

According to the iSafe Foundation:

  • At least 52% of teens have been bullied online.

  • 35% of children have actually been threatened online, some more than once.

  • About 53 percent of children have said something that was mean or hurtful to someone else online.

According to the Teen Online & Wireless Safety Survey conducted in 2009:

  • 34 percent of those who participated in cyberbullying did so both as victims and as bullies.

According to a 2013 survey carried out by Trolled Nation, on behalf of Knowthenet.org:

  • 37 percent of cyberbullying incidents go unreported.

  • Almost 85 percent of 19-year-old males have admitted to being victims of cyberbullying incidents without reporting them.

 

[1] CDC, NCIPC. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) [online]. (2010) {2013 Aug. 1}.  Available from:www.cdc.gov/ncipc/wisqars. 

[2] CDC. (2011). Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[3] CDC. (2011). Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health-Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9-12: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[4] Grossman, A.H. & D'Augelli, A.R. (2007). Transgender Youth and Life-Threatening Behaviors. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behaviors.37(5), 527-37.

[5] Family Acceptance Project™. (2009). Family rejection as a predictor of negative health outcomes in white and Latino lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults. Pediatrics. 123(1), 346-52.

[6] CDC. (2011). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[7] CDC. (2011). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[8] IMPACT. (2010). Mental health disorders, psychological distress, and suicidality in a diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths. American Journal of Public Health. 100(12), 2426-32.

 

[9] JAMA Pediatrics Network study, 2013.

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